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Turboprop Charter Caribbean

Crazy Airport Security: Flying from Big Airports is a Mess

Posted by Joshua Plave on May 23, 2011 11:56:00 AM

Private aviation has shorter security lines than commercial flights

In the days following the raid on Osama bin Laden’s compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, security measures being taken at commercial airports has ramped up. In the uncertainty following the killing of such a polarizing figure, TSA has required additional searches and increased scrutiny over commercial air travel for the masses.

Adding to what has already proven to be a hassle and overall mess, longer security lines and waiting times are leading to more and more travel stress as time goes on. Nearly every significant event these days, whether good or bad, leads to an elevation of oversight, with no foreseeable end.

But private aviation, yet again, has proven its worth. Being able to skip the security lines and avoid the hassle of commercial airport terminals is an invaluable opportunity, protecting a flyer’s most valuable asset: time. Though security measures are also improved for business aviation, the smaller number of passengers on each aircraft leaves little to no impact on travelers.

Charter flights also have greater access to more airports across the country. For example, Magellan Jets has the ability to arrange flights to over 5,000 airports within just the US. The vast majority of these options have decreased flight risk (runway incursions, busy airspace, crowded tarmac space, etc.) and little to no security hassle.

So until a major overhaul of the dated security system the TSA has in place at commercial airports takes place, private jets will take the cake for efficiently getting travelers from A to B, with minimal stress and increased comfort.

Topics: Private Jets, Aviation News, Business Aviation, TSA