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Could this be the 797? Boeing Granted Bizarre Patent

Posted by Joshua Plave on Apr 11, 2011 9:37:00 AM

Boeing was granted US patent Number 7,900,865 on March 8, 2011 for an incredibly unique and revolutionary type of aircraft. With a design the likes of which have never been seen in the commercial aircraft industry, Boeing may just be gearing up for the 797, the 737’s successor. The patent includes the following design features:

  • Canard elevators on the forward fuselage.
  • An elliptical wide body fuselage that could accommodate twin aisles.
  • Wings mounted at the 10 and 2 o'clock position on the rear fuselage.
  • Forward swept wings with a forward wing sweep of 15 to 19 degrees.
  • Engines mounted on pylons at the rear of the fuselage.
  • The rear fuselage and wings extended to form a horizontal stabilizer and elevator.
  • Two canted vertical stabilizers
  • Main landing gear contained in the rear fuselage
  • The design can accommodate high bypass turbofans, counter-rotating prop jets or turboprop engines.
  • Engine location above the fuselage and surrounded by vertical stabilizers to reduce engine noise.

The image below from Boeing’s patent application shows what the new aircraft could look like.

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Strange, yes, but there are many design aspects which will enhance the passenger experience for travelers around the world. The placement of the engines is sure to create the quietest cabin in the skies, as well as the quietest aircraft to those on the ground. With wings in the rear of the aircraft, incredible views will be afforded to passengers throughout the cabin.

Boeing has said nothing to confirm that this will be the 797, but rumors have it that the manufacturer and airlines have had discussions that a 737 replacement will have twin aisles for increased passenger comfort.

To view the patent which has incredible number of informative images, click here.

Topics: Boeing, Aviation News, News