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Turboprop Charter Caribbean

Ditch the Freeways and Hit the Airways

Posted by Mike D'Alessandro on Apr 9, 2012 4:23:00 PM

Pal V

All of us at one point or another have wished our land-locked vehicles could sprout wings and soar above the traffic on the way to work. Unfortunately, except for those whose office is in a lower Manhattan skyscraper or downtown hospital, many buildings don’t boast a heliport on the roof. Therefore, since the infancy of motorized transportation the masses have been forced to deal with the inevitable left lane breakdown, jack-knifed tractor-trailer or ten car pileup during the rush hour commute. Your traffic nightmares may soon come to end, however, as new technology is emerging that will allow drivers to instantly become aviators and leave the traffic behind. Dutch company PAL-V Europe NV recently launched their flying car prototype, the Pal-V One, and is looking to bring the concept to the market.

540 feet of clear road is all that separates the operator from the sky thanks to the Pal-V One’s sleek “helicopter-like” design. The prototype meets all existing motor vehicle and aircraft design requirements in all major markets and will require no additional infrastructure construction. Once airborne, the Pal-V One will cruise at speeds up to 110 MPH with a range of around 275 miles. The vehicle will conveniently run on automotive gasoline with biodiesel and bio-ethanol versions eventually becoming available. Once on the ground, the slim and aerodynamic 3-wheel design of the Pal-V One synergizes the comfort and safety of a car with the handling characteristics of a motorcycle. 20 to 30 hours of training is required for operator certification and prospective buyers include police, military, civilian users and corporations. The prototype is gaining popularity in Europe while in the final development stage and hopefully will make its way to the US in coming years. 

Topics: Aviation News